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The Importance of Posting Injury/Illness Summaries

Julie Copeland

Posted by
CEO

Documenting injuries is very important for businesses and employees.Injury_3.jpeg

As shared by the US Department of Labor, under the OSHA Recordkeeping regulation (29 CFR 1904), covered employers are required to prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses, using the OSHA 300 Log. This information is important for employers, workers and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards.

In 2014, OSHA announced changes to the list of industries that are exempt from the requirement to routinely keep OSHA injury and illness records, and to the list of severe work-related injuries and illnesses that all covered employers must report to OSHA. These new requirements went into effect on January 1, 2015 for workplaces under Federal OSHA jurisdiction. 

So what does this mean for most businesses?

All employers must report the following:

  1. All work-related fatalities within 8 hours.
  2. All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, all amputations and all losses of an eye within 24 hours.

Report to OSHA by

  1. Calling OSHA's free and confidential number at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742).
  2. Calling your closest Area Office during normal business hours.
  3. Using the online form.

Only fatalities occurring within 30 days of the work-related incident must be reported to OSHA. Further, for an in-patient hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye, these incidents must be reported to OSHA only if they occur within 24 hours of the work-related incident.

OSHA reminds employers to post OSHA's Form 300A, which summarizes the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses. This summary needs to be displayed in a common area where notices OSHA_Form_300A.jpgto employees are usually posted.

Employers with 10 or fewer employees and employers in certain industries are normally exempt from federal OSHA injury and illness recordkeeping and posting requirements. A complete list of exempt industries in the retail, services, finance, insurance and real estate sectors can be found at http://s.dol.gov/YP. Read the news release for more information on recordkeeping requirements.

The reporting of injuries, illnesses and deaths that might occur in your organization will help OSHA carry out its mission of saving lives, preventing injuries and protecting the health of America’s workers.  Yes, reporting does take time, but it is mandated. It’s critical to capture and share this information.

Many companies fail to fully appreciate the overall costs of safety, and have not drawn the connection between the implementation of best practices and the procurement of safety related products. Arbill offers innovative industrial safety products, services and training to protect your workers so that the reporting of injuries could be a thing of the past.

Contact a Safety Account Manager today to discuss best practices for protecting your workers. Visit www.arbill.com for more information on our safety products and services.  We hope that you find our blogs useful – please feel free to share with your colleagues and friends – the more workplace injuries that we can prevent will bring us closer to our goal.  Subscribe here and we will continue to provide important safety information for you and your employees.

Stay safe!

Topics: Arbill, workplace injury, OSHA, Safety logs, Keep workers safe

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