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TOPIC: Safe-every-day

Burning Questions about Chemical Safety

Imagine your employees are working with chemicals when something goes wrong. Maybe it’s a slip or a splash, but in an instant, chemicals splatter the eyes or the skin. And in that instant, the employee can sustain severe damage if the employee and his/her coworkers don’t act quickly.

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Safety Focus: Special Teams

I’ve often said that the secret sauce in our safety business is our people. 

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OSHA’s Proposal to Improve Tracking Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

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Is your first aid kit compliant?

First aid provides the initial and immediate attention to a person suffering an injury or illness and in extreme cases a quick first aid response could mean the difference between life and death.  In some cases, first aid can reduce the severity of the injury or illness and can also calm the injured person, reducing stress and anxiety.

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How to Implement a Successful Hearing Loss Prevention Program

A successful hearing loss prevention program benefits both the company and the affected employee.  Employees are spared disabling hearing impairments and evidence suggests that they may experience less fatigue and generally better health.  Ultimately, the company benefits from reduced medical expenses and worker compensation costs.  In some cases there may be improved morale and work efficiency.

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Selecting Proper Hearing Protection

Hearing protection is required if a worker is subject to noise above 85 decibels over an eight-hour period. If hearing protection is required, then a complete hearing loss prevention program should be instituted.  We will discuss hearing loss prevention programs in our next blog. 

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The Effects of Noise in the Workplace - on Employees and your Profit

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Occupational hearing loss is the most common work-related injury in the United States (especially in the manufacturing sector).  Approximately 22 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, and an additional 9 million exposed to ototoxic chemicals. An estimated $242 million is spent annually on worker’s compensation for hearing loss disability

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