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TOPIC: Workplace-hazards

Get a Handle on Hand Safety: 5 Keys to Prevent Workplace Injuries


When you went online to read this article, chances are you didn’t have to stop and think about how you were going to navigate your keyboard. What about when you buttoned your shirt, ate your breakfast or picked up your car keys this morning? Probably not. A hand injury can make the multitude of tasks that we take for granted a serious, if not impossible, challenge. Maybe for the short term, or perhaps, permanently.

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Machine Safety: 5 Tips to Prevent Workplace Injuries


Machinery in the workplace can be of great benefit if used correctly and safely. Heavy machinery easily completes many tasks in a timely manner, but these machines are also capable of causing great harm if not used properly. Misusing heavy machinery leads to a variety of serious workplace injuries and fatalities.

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Electrical Safety: 14 Tips to Prevent Workplace Accidents


According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) about 76,000 office workers nationwide have disabling injuries every year. Although the most frequent types of incidents are falls (either from height, tripping or slippery surfaces), many injuries also occur as the result of contact with electrical equipment or appliances.

Almost everything in an office setting today operates on electricity.  Electrical equipment used in an office, is potentially hazardous and can cause serious shock and burn injuries if improperly used or maintained.  If a part of the body comes in contact with the electrical circuit, a shock will occur. The current will enter the body at one point and leave at another and this passage of electricity, can cause great pain, burns, and even death.

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Workplace Hazards Start Small: 4 Common Mistakes to Avoid


No matter how careful you are, accidents happen. Sometimes it's nothing more than a stubbed toe. But what happens when an employee suffers a more severe injury on the job? Your company could lose a valuable team member for a period of time and open itself up to potential liability.

It is everyone's responsibility to help create a culture of safety around the workplace. That means noticing and remedying the little hazards before they grow into big headaches.

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5 Workplace Safety Mistakes You Can't Afford to Make


OSHA requires employers to provide employees with working conditions that are free of known dangers. This is the crux of workplace safety and Arbill’s initiative to get every worker home safely after every shift.

Workplace injuries and illnesses are largely preventable, but workplace safety initiatives require both vigilance in safety training and inspections, along with strict adherence to all rules and regulations to be effective.

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The 10 Most Dangerous Jobs in America


This past December, the Bureau of Labor Statistics released the National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2015. According to the report, there were 4,836 fatal work injuries in 2015, which is the highest since 2008 (5,214 fatal injuries). The overall rate of fatal work injuries was 3.38 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, which was lower than the 2014 rate of 3.43.

Of the 4,836 fatal injuries in 2015, over 50% happened in the Construction, Transportation, Agriculture Forestry, Fishing and Professional Services industries. The Agriculture, forestry, fishing, and hunting industry had the highest fatal work injury rate, 22.8 per 100,000 full-time workers, and the Construction industry had the highest number of fatal work injuries, 937.

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Safety Footwear: Keys to Protect Your Worker's Feet


Foot injuries can be quite painful… and costly. They can sideline a worker or a team and add tremendous cost to your bottom line. Of the 12 million work-related injuries that happen on average each year, the U.S. Department of Labor reports that 10% of those injuries are to the feet and ankles.

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Chemical Safety: 4 Ways to Protect Employees


More than 32 million workers (more than 20% of the entire U.S. workforce) are exposed to hazardous chemical products in the workplace. According to the Occupational Health & Safety Administration (OSHA), 650,000 different chemicals are present in more than 3 million American workplaces.

Hazardous chemicals were the cause of nearly 3 million nonfatal private industry injuries or illnesses in 2014 and the dangers of these chemicals present extreme challenges for both employers and employees.

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5 Most Common Workplace Accidents: Keys to Prevent Injuries


There are a variety of ways to reduce injuries in your workplace. The two most effective include predictive software, like Arbill's Vantage Predictive Analytics, and common-sense preventative measures that both comply with governmental safety regulations and are practical to your given work environment.

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Shocking Costs of Electrical Incidents


Every year in the United States, workplace electrical incidents result in more than 300 deaths and 3,500 injuries. While electrical hazards are not the leading cause of on-the-job injuries and fatalities, they are disproportionately fatal and costly with 1 in 13 electrical injuries resulting in death.



According to OSHA, electrical incidents cause an average of 13 days away from work and nearly one fatality every day. Electrical incidents rank 6th among all causes of work related deaths in the U.S. Over the past decade, 46,000 workers were injured from on the job electrical hazards and a worker is severely hurt every 30 minutes from electricity.  

Electrocution is not the only injury employees can get from electrical hazards. Additional injuries include burns, hearing loss, lacerations and other health issues. An especially dangerous event is what’s called an Arc Flash. An arc flash is the light and heat produced by an electric arc supplied with sufficient electrical energy to cause substantial damage, harm, fire, or injury. Electrical arcs experience negative resistance, which causes the electrical resistance to decrease as the arc temperature increases.

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